FAQs

Here are the responses to some of the most popular questions we receive.

  • General questions
  • Fundraising questions
  • Donation questions
  • How do I fundraise for Cambodian Children’s Trust?

    Thanks for getting involved! Please see our fundraising page for some inspiration around the kinds of things you could do. Already have an idea? Please click here to register your event and let us know what you’re up to.

  • What’s the process once I’ve submitted my event?

    Once you’ve submitted your event registration form, you’ll receive a confirmation email that your application has successfully been received. Please allow up to 48 hours for this to come through.

    We will then review your registration and notify you on approval within 5-7 working days. Upon approval, we will also provide you with some additional resources to help bring your fundraising event to life.

  • How long does fundraising approval take?

    Please allow 5-7 working days for approval.

  • When can I support CCT?

    Anytime! We need donations to continue our work all year round, so get involved with fundraising whenever suits you. We recommend leaving enough time to promote your event, so give yourself a bit of a window to plan.

  • What support can CCT provide me with?

    Please register your event to receive a fundraising pack including key information about CCT, fundraising tips and promotional assets such as social media graphics, posters and email signatures.

  • How do I promote my event?

    Please register your event and we will provide you with some promotional guidelines and tips.

  • Can CCT provide liability insurance for my event?

    CCT is unable to provide public liability insurance to community fundraising events. This is the responsibility of the event coordinator to arrange in tandem with the venue.

  • How do I donate funds raised to CCT?

    Full donation information will be provided in your event pack. This can be made through our website, via direct bank deposit or alternatively, you can set up an everydayhero page here.

  • What is everydayhero?

    everydayhero is an easy-to-use fundraising platform that helps generous people, like you, connect with the organisations they love. Follow the everydayhero prompts to create your supporter page, choose CCT as your chosen charity then easily direct people to your page to make donations. Too easy!

  • Can I hold a lottery, contest or auction at my event?

    Absolutely! Please be aware, each state has different regulations. Find out more here.

  • Can people who donate get a tax deductable receipt?

    Cambodian Children’s Trust (CCT) is a community partner and an approved project of the Australia Cambodia Foundation (ACF). Through this partnership we are able to offer tax deductible donations to donors from Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States.

    To inquire about making tax deductible donations from the UK or USA please contact us. We will provide receipts to all other international donors. We are working on international tax deductibility in other countries and will update this notice in due course.

  • Can CCT provide liability insurance for my event?

    CCT is unable to provide public liability insurance to community fundraising events. This is the responsibility of the event coordinator to arrange in tandem with the venue.

  • What is CCT? What do you do?

    Cambodian Children’s Trust (CCT) is a secular, non-profit, community development organisation working with children and families in Battambang. We deliver a holistic range of services to help families break the intergenerational cycle of poverty in Cambodia.

    At CCT we achieve our goals by delivering a Family-Based Care Model that ensure children can remain living with their biological family, or where that’s not possible, are cared for in family-based care such as kinship care or foster care. We also assist children who have been placed in institutional care to be safely reintegrated back into their families or into family-based care. This is achieved while ensuring children have access to education, good nutrition and healthcare, and that their personal safety and other fundamental human rights are not compromised.

    CCT’s holistic range of programs and services are based out of our community youth centres, community preschool, foster care homes and social enterprise.

    We work with the Government and other NGOs to ensure children are not separated from their families and institutionalised unnecessarily.

  • What does your organisation do for Cambodian children?

    CCT delivers a holistic range of services to help children and families break the intergenerational cycle of poverty in Cambodia. Our community, education and social enterprise programs are delivered out of our community youth centres, community preschool, foster care homes and social enterprise restaurant.

    At CCT we achieve our goals by delivering a Family-Based Care Model that ensure children can remain living with their biological family, or where that’s not possible, are cared for in family-based care such as kinship care or foster care. We also assist children who have been placed in institutional care to be safely reintegrated back into their families or into family-based care. This is achieved while ensuring children have access to education, good nutrition and healthcare, and that their personal safety and other fundamental human rights are not compromised.

    We work with the Cambodian government and other non-profit organisations to prevent children from being institutionalised unnecessarily by providing long-term sustainable solutions that keep families together.

    Read more about our services and programs here.

  • What is the history of CCT?

    CCT was established in 2007 when Tara Winkler and Jedtha Pon (with the support of the Cambodian Ministry of Social Affairs, Veteran and Youth Rehabilitation) rescued 14 children from a corrupt and abusive orphanage in Battambang. The inspiring full story was the subject of an ABC Australian Story documentary.

    Since then CCT has changed our model away from residential care, and grown to become a community development organisation with a holistic model of programs and services that enable vulnerable children in Battambang to break free from the intergenerational cycle of poverty, while promoting family preservation and reintegration.

  • Is CCT an orphanage?

    No, we are not an orphanage. We believe families are the best place for children, and all of the children supported through our holistic range of services live in a family. 100% of the children CCT supports are living in families.

    There are many different family models; some children live with their biological parents, grandparents or aunties and uncles.

    Sometimes, when children are at risk in their home environment and there is no safe alternative, they are cared for by our lovely foster care parents in our family-based group homes. Our social workers regularly assess the child’s family situation to determine if and when reintegration back to their biological family might be possible. Only after exhausting all efforts for family reunification and kinship care is a child placed in foster care, and individual case plans, ongoing reassessment and permanency planning is conducted with each child.

    Our successful reintegration of children from residential care back into their families, where they are now thriving, proves that 100% family-based care is possible in Cambodia.

  • How do you decide who can be in your programs?

    The majority of children and families in our programs are referred to CCT by the local Department of Social Affairs, Veterans and Youth (DoSAVY). Additional assessments are done by Commune Councils, the Commune Committee for Women and Children, and by CCT.

    CCT’s trained social workers carry out family visits, meet with community leaders and carry out detailed assessments including means testing to determine the level of need. Where there are significant hardships and risk factors, our team determines that a family is right for enrollment in our programs.

  • How has CCT improved the education of the children in your programs?

    The standard of education in Cambodia is quite poor when compared to international education systems. Many of the children in the public system only go to school for half the day and/or have had their learning disrupted due to challenges in their family environment.

    All the children that CCT supports are enrolled in public school and CCT supplements this education through our educational and extra-curricular programs.

    In 2015, we introduced our Information Communication Technology (ICT) program into one of Battambang’s public high school. The program is of an international standard, based on Australia’s digital learning curriculum, and ensures that Cambodian youth are learning the crucial skills they will need to navigate through an increasingly digital world.

    We also established a School in the Cloud classroom at our second youth centre, which gives students the opportunity to direct their own learning, feed their curiosity and pursue fun, intellectual journeys.

  • How does the foster care program work?

    Sometimes, when children are at risk and there is no safe kinship care alternative, we place children in family-based group homes with their siblings, where they are cared for by loving foster parents.

    Children are only placed in the care of foster parents as an absolute last resort, or when they have come from an orphanage and are in the process of being reintegrated back to their family.

    As part of CCT’s Community Outreach program, we do a lot of family tracing and constantly re-evaluate the family environment to determine if the child can be reintegrated back with their family. CCT has reintegrated 26 children from residential care back to the community.

    We are also working with the government and other NGOs to ensure that children are not separated from their families and institutionalised unnecessarily.

  • Can I visit CCT?

    Of course! There are two main reasons why we conduct educational visits to CCT:

    Transparency: CCT is a small grassroots organisation that relies on the generous donations of our supporters in order to continue delivering life-changing services in Battambang. We believe we have a duty to show you that the work you’re funding is really happening, and achieving so much!

    Education: We believe CCT’s model has the potential to change globally the way vulnerable children in poor communities are supported – providing CCT presentations and project visits is a powerful way for us to spread the word about our model and help others better understand our work.

    To help the project visit run as smoothly as possible, there are some things we’d like you to know in advance:

    Wherever possible, we ask for at least two weeks notice to schedule visits of CCT’s projects.

    1. To ensure our donations go where they should, we ask all visitors to fund their own transportation to our office and around our projects, which are spread across Battambang. You can either organize your own tuk-tuk or vehicle, and we’ll make a plan for the best place to meet you.

    2. Please bring a copy of your passport, and if you don’t have a passport please bring a photocopy of your photo ID.

    3. We believe that child protection is the most important thing (after all, this is why we are here!) and all visits are conducted with strict adherence to our Child Protection Policy. To protect the privacy of the children in CCT’s programs, we don’t allow you to take photos of our project sites. If you would like images of the projects you’ve visited, we can send them through to you.

    4. Also, if you work for an NGO or another organisation please bring your own Child Protection Policy.

  • Can I volunteer for CCT?

    Thanks for your interest in helping us! Throughout the year CCT recruits for skilled, usually long-term technical paid roles for which international applicants may apply. You can keep an eye on our LinkedIn, Facebook page, and Working for CCT page of our website. We generally hire for a minimum of six months – ideally one or more years.

    For example: our foreign human resources manager recently set up our HR department, which is now entirely coordinated by a Khmer team, and last year we welcomed in our first Khmer graphic designer to replace the role of our foreign creative content coordinator.

    From time to time we do also take on short-term skilled volunteers who are able to provide self-funded support to us with special tasks such as dentistry, capacity building of social workers (e.g. running counselling workshops). If you think you have a skill that could help CCT and you’re available to be a self-funded volunteer, please write to us and let us know your skill set and availability – so we can see if we can utilize your generosity within our team.

    CCT does not accept short-term unskilled volunteers, and we firmly oppose the practice of short-term, unskilled volunteering with vulnerable children. Many organisations allow untrained, un-vetted volunteers to have access to children – not only is this an enormous child protection risk, but for children who have had disrupted family lives, having a stream of even the most well-meaning adults in and out of their lives can cause attachments disorders and affect children emotionally, mentally and permanently.

    Voluntourism also feeds an industry that separates families – as many children in Cambodian orphanages are there to drive the donations from visitors, funds which are then often embezzled.

    Unskilled volunteering can also take jobs away from local skilled people, who rely on employment to feed their families. Unemployment is a major contributing factor to poverty, which is why we hire local people and support local businesses whenever possible.

    More than 90% of CCT’s team is Khmer, and almost all staff members interacting with the children on a daily basis (for example: teachers and social workers) are from Cambodia. This means that the children are surrounded by positive role models who know their language and culture – a lot of which was lost during the Khmer Rouge – and can build long-term stable relationships, rather than short-term periods of bonding followed by separation (which can have negative impacts on children that stay with them for life).

    There are other ways to become involved from hosting a fundraiser to liking us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter or Instagram and sharing our posts. See our How to help page for more information, and sign up for our e-newsletter.

    And, if you ever find yourself in Battambang, we’d be happy to organise an educational visit for you to learn more about CCT’s work.

    Also, you can read more about making good choices when volunteering here: http://learningservice.info/. This TED talk might also give you some food for thought: TED Talk Daniela Papi ‘What’s wrong with volunteer travel?’  https://youtu.be/oYWl6Wz2NB8.

  • What is the best way to help?

    As a small grass-roots organisation, funding continues to be our biggest challenge. Our work is made possible because of the generous help we receive from our supporters – and for that we are extremely grateful!

    The best way to help us is to join our Make It Possible regular giving team, make a single donation, or host a fundraising event. If you want to leave a legacy to Cambodia’s youth – you could leave a bequest in your will.

    You can also spread the word by liking us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter or Instagram and sharing our posts.

    Plus, if you ever find yourself in Battambang, we’d be pleased to organise an educational visit for you to learn more about CCT’s work.

    And finally, you can help us through our advocacy work – We have no real budget for advocacy, but so much change can be achieved through simply spreading the word and helping us spread vital messages. Please check out our resources page for more information and some key messages to share.

  • Does CCT employ local staff?

    Yes, the majority of our staff are Cambodian. Our Co-Founder and Governance Director, Pon Jedtha, is Cambodian, as are our social workers, program managers, teachers, accountants, and many others on our team. It is our goal to one day have CCT entirely Cambodian run.

    Wherever possible, we hire staff locally and currently over 90% of our staff is Cambodian. We are committed to providing long-term and sustainable solutions, which is best achieved by strengthening local systems and working with people who will be here in the long-term.

    From time to time, we hire foreign technical advisors with skill sets that we cannot source in-country. The role of a technical advisor is to mentor local staff so we can build the capacity required to operate an entirely Cambodian run organisation.

     

  • Does CCT have any religious affiliations?

    CCT is an apolitical and secular organization, serving all individuals equally, regardless of gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, or political affiliation.

    As Cambodia is a primarily Buddhist country, many of our staff and the children and families we work with follow Buddhist traditions and belief systems – however religion in no way affects who CCT will offer support to.

  • What other ways can I support CCT while I’m in Battambang?

    Welcome to Battambang! The best way to support us while you’re here is to visit our social enterprise, Jaan Bai restaurant.

    Jaan Bai won the 2015 Certificate of Excellence on TripAdvisor and continues to be ranked the #1 restaurant in Battambang. So, by eating at Jaan Bai you’ll have a fantastic meal while also supporting employment for local youth.

    We’d also be pleased to organise an educational visit for you to learn more about CCT’s projects. Please let us know in advance and we’d be happy to arrange a visit for you. All project visits are carried out in line with our Child Protection Policy.

  • Is CCT registered in Cambodia?

    Yes, CCT is registered in Cambodia (registration #1123) with the Ministry of the Interior and has a partnership agreement with the Ministry of Social Affairs, Veterans and Youth Rehabilitation.

  • What is the difference between CCT and CCTA?

    Cambodian Children’s Trust (CCT) is registered as a local NGO in Cambodia (registration #1123).

    Cambodian Children’s Trust Australia (CCTA) was established to support the work of CCT (Business Number 83 158 383 558).

    CCTA is registered as a charity with the Australian Charities and Not-For-Profits Commission.

  • Is CCT a trust fund?

    CCT is not a trust fund, although we do have official permission from the Australian Securities and Investment Commission to use the word ‘Trust’ in our name.

  • What payment methods do you accept?

    We accept donations by credit card and debit card through our online donations system or you can call 1300 664 799.

  • Can I donate clothes or other items to CCT?

    Thank you for your offer to donate items to CCT. It is always best to contact us first when thinking about donating items. As a small organisation, we unfortunately lack the administrative resources to process in-kind donation, plus the Cambodian mail service can often be unreliable and expensive.

    From time-to-time we do require particular items that are difficult to source in-country; however, we also like to support local businesses so please consider making a single donation by clicking here. Donating directly saves on expensive shipping costs, and allows us to buy much-needed items at Cambodian prices. Our team also does a good job at sourcing the right goods at the right price, which means your donation goes a little bit further to helping children and families in Battambang.

    If you are coming to Battambang to visit us, some items we are regularly in need of include:

    – Quality motorbike helmets (adult and child sized)
    – Functional laptops, flash-drives, external hard-drives, tablets and smartphones (with chargers) for use by our community outreach, operations and education teams.
    – Unused digital thermometers, sphygmometers, stethoscopes, otoscopes and glucometers.

     

  • Is my donation tax-deductible?

    Cambodian Children’s Trust (CCT) is able to offer tax deductibility to our supporters from Australia through our Australian partner, CCTA.

    CCTA will be able to offer tax deductible donations to donors in the USA soon through Charities Aid Foundation of America (CAF America). If you’re from America and would like to make a donation while we’re establishing our fund with CAF America, send us an email to [email protected] and we’ll let you know when it’s all set up and ready to go.

    To find out about tax deductibility in your own country, drop us a line at [email protected]

  • How much of my donation goes toward your programs? What does CCT spend on administration?

    CCT’s work in Cambodia is almost 100% funded by donations from generous Australia individuals, companies and trusts.

    Donors play an important role at CCT. The capacity to deliver life-changing services to vulnerable children and families is made possible because of the generous support that we receive.

    Around 10% of these funds are spent in Australia – these costs include our website, database system, phone, software licenses, a small amount of advertising and fundraising costs, some of Tara Winkler’s travel and our annual audit costs and other costs that allow CCT to function and work towards adequate funding of our work.  We don’t have an office in Australia however at times we employ several staff (some part-time) to make sure our systems are working smoothly – for example the sending out of Tax Receipts at the end of each Financial Year.

    The remaining funds (around 90%) are spent here in Cambodia on the operation of CCT’s holistic range of programs and services based out of our community youth centres, community preschool, foster care homes and social enterprise.

    An external auditor reviews our books annually and our donations are processed by a secured system.

    Click here to view our latest annual report including financials. Or click here to make a donation and help children and families escape the intergenerational cycle of poverty.